Carter Craig, Attorneys at Law

September 2014 Archives

contextual

Determining eligibility for Social Security disability benefits

According to the Social Security Administration, one in four workers in their 20s will become disabled before reaching the average retirement age of 67. Many people in Virginia don't have a safety net to fall back on if an injury or accident happens to them rendering them unable to work. Luckily, Social Security disability can be an option.

"Legal Separation" - A Status without Meaning

"I want to file for a legal separation."  The statement, although often heard, has no meaning in Virginia's divorce process.  Separation of the parties to a marriage is a condition to either party filing for a divorce if time apart is the sole ground (a "no fault" divorce).  Intent must also be present.  The parties must have separated with one of them intending to live separate and apart from the other continuously and without interruption for the statutorily established length of time.  Also, there must have existed, at the time of separation, the intent to ultimately end the marriage in divorce.  The lesson?  A married couple may have separated but not have had the required intent in separating to establish grounds for a divorce.

Residents request help with dangerous Halifax County road

Drivers in Virginia face many obstacles every day. Other motorists may be distracted, someone may not stop at a stop sign or maybe someone is driving too fast and loses control of their car. Many car accidents are caused because of a driver being distracted, speeding or driving under the influence. When these conditions combine with a dangerous road, it can be recipe for disaster.

Virginia Workers' Compensation Primer - Part II

In Part I of our discussion of Virginia's workers' compensation law, we noted that being injured in an "unsafe workplace" provides the injured worker no right to sue her employer in Virginia courts.  Injuries received "in the course of" and "arising out of" the worker's employment are limited by and compensated only according to the Virginia Workers' Compensation Act (the "Act").

Filing a wrongful death claim after a deadly accident

Losing a loved one can be devastating. Not only can it be difficult to adjust to life without a family member, but the expenses and loss of income caused by his or her absence could create significant financial burdens on the family. If another person is found to be negligent in the death of a loved one, the family retains the right to file a wrongful death claim seeking damages recoverable under Virginia law.