Carter Craig, Attorneys at Law

September 2016 Archives

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OSHA says that new program for reporting injuries is a success

Virginia workers may know that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration executed a new program last year that all businesses must now follow. The program, implemented on Jan. 1, 2015, requires employers to report severe injuries such as amputations, hospitalizations and eye loss to OSHA within 24 hours of them occurring. So far, OSHA has noted that many employers are going above and beyond what federal law requires of them for keeping employees safe.

Speed limiters for trucks proposed to reduce truck fatalities

According to the Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the number of truck fatalities rose 4.1 percent from 2014 to 2015 in the United States. The NHTSA reported that 2014 had the highest number of truck fatalities since 2008. Due to the increase in fatalities involving large trucks, there have been many discussions and debates about what steps the federal government should make to deal with this issue.

Car safety tech already benefiting older drivers

Executives in the automotive industry caution that fully automated vehicles could be years away. Technological enhancements that potentially reduce the likelihood of accidents, however, already appear on newer vehicle models. Some of these, like automatic brakes, automatic parking and rear-mounted cameras, could help older adults in Virginia and around the country drive safely and maintain their mobility.

Work culture can affect workplace safety

When people in Virginia think about improving workplace safety, they usually think first about the physical risks at a job site. Hazards like a cluttered work area, malfunctioning equipment and toxic substances can all cause serious workplace accidents. While it is important to reduce physical risks, it is also crucial to assess some of the less visible risks on a job site that can be just as dangerous for workers.

Big jump in traffic fatalities in 2015

Virginia motorists may have done more driving in 2015 than they did in 2014, if national statistics hold in that state. Last year, job growth and lower gas prices contributed to the largest year-to-year increase in vehicle miles traveled around the country in almost 25 years. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the 3.5 percent increase in vehicle miles traveled had a significant impact on the number of traffic fatalities in 2015.